Just like we banded together as the Mud Army through the 2011 floods – we need to band together right now. Which is why the Queensland Government is calling on all Queenslanders to join the Care Army.

The Care Army is made up of everyday Queenslanders who want to help older and vulnerable people living in the community who may not have friends, family or neighbours who are able to support them during the COVID-19 outbreak.

As many of our fellow Australians and their communities continue to be impacted by the devastating fires and begin to adjust to the reality of their loss and long road to recovery and regrowth, we thank you for your concern and care. Our hearts and thoughts continue to go out to everyone affected. We are grateful to the thousands of dedicated, highly trained emergency services personnel working tirelessly to respond to these disasters as well as the countless volunteers and Australian and international Defence Force personnel working to support recovery efforts.

If you are in a fire-affected area please look after the safety of yourself and your family, friends, neighbours and local community first. 

At this time the best action you can take is to stop and listen to and follow the directions of trusted sources including authorities. They will let you know what the best course of action is both now and going forward. 

Volunteering is a very good way to help in times of need, but it is important for you to be mindful to always stop and listen first. This will ensure the right help is given at the right time in the right place. Remember that additional volunteers are unlikely to be engaged during or immediately after a disaster, with volunteering more likely to be needed in the long-term recovery.

Read more on how you can support those impacted by the destructive fires.

The historic Queensland Human Rights Act will be introduced from 01 January 2020. The Act is intended to protect and respect the freedom, equality and dignity of every person in Queensland. It is also a vehicle to help deliver better services and support for all Queenslanders, especially for those experiencing vulnerabilities in our society.

The Settlement Council of Australia (SCoA) and Volunteering Australia have today released their report, ‘Volunteering and Settlement in Australia’, with a snapshot of the volunteering activities of new migrants and refugees in Australia.

In the settlement sector, 65 per cent of new arrivals to Australia volunteered within the first 18 months of their arrival to Australia, to contribute to society, make friends, improve their English or gain local work experience.